How to Help A Loved One Suffering From Addiction

If you think that someone you love is addicted to drugs, it’s important to handle the situation carefully.

What to Understand Before Talking to a Loved One

Before you talk to your loved one about treatment options, you need to approach them about the problem. It’s important that you don’t confront your loved one in a way that will cause an argument. It’s common for those abusing drugs to get angry and defensive easily, so you need to approach the situation with care.1

It’s natural to be afraid to approach your loved one about drug use, because of the uncertainty of how they will react. However, it could be a life-changing effort for you to overcome your apprehensions and have the conversation. You can approach your loved one with compassion and empathy and ask if they will consider getting the help they need.1

A variety of addiction treatment centers and therapeutic approaches exist to best match the specific needs of each individual. Whether you’re looking for inpatient or outpatient treatment, there are many options out there for anyone looking to take their life back from addiction.

What Do Parents Need to Know?

When you have a child struggling with substance abuse, attempting to handle it on your own can be extremely overwhelming and can eventually become your first and only priority. It may also be difficult to take the first step because addressing the problem is disruptive of school and extracurricular activities.2 However, addiction is far more disruptive to your child’s life in the end, and treatment can work. Taking the time now to get help can save your child’s life.

Signs and Symptoms

People who are addicted to drugs tend to show signs of the disease in every aspect of their lives. The symptoms of addiction are varied, but common signs of a problem with substance abuse include:3,4

  • Needing to use drugs to avoid withdrawal symptoms.
  • Needing more drugs to get the effects (tolerance).
  • Continuing use of drugs even with the awareness of the harm it causes.
  • Neglecting family obligations and financial issues.
  • Continuing to use drugs or alcohol despite declining physical health.
  • Losing interest in hobbies.
  • Rapidly shifting moods.
  • Changes in sleep schedule.
  • Changes in eating habits (eating more or less than usual).
[As seen on DrugAbuse.com]
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